Tungsten is often associated with light bulbs. It is a rare element, which never occurs in nature by itself, but always tied in with oxygen. It is a rare element, which never occurs by itself, but always tied in with oxygen.

In 1574, tungsten as a mineral was first referenced in scientific literature with the name 'Wolferam'. Hence its chemical symbol is 'W' and atomic number is 74. The name, Wolferam, derived from German word wolf.

Tungsten is heavy with a density two and a half times that of iron and equal to gold. As a carbide, its hardness is only second to the diamond. The most valued quality of tungsten is that it retains its strength at high temperatures as it holds the maximum melting point for metal at 6152 degree Fahrenheit.

Due to it's versatility, tungsten has been established as a strategic metal. Tungsten is listed as a "critical raw material" by the EU in 2010, due to its "high economic importance and high relative supply risk". Highspeed steel tools, which are crucial for mass production are manufactured using tungsten, tungsten alloy steels and tungsten carbides. Tungsten in its different forms is suitable for many uses. As a pure metal it is used in electronics and electric lighting. It is also used in alloy steels for high temperature purposes such as railway tracks, in tungsten carbide for cutting or drilling tools and armour piercing projectiles. Chemically treated tungsten pigments are used in dyes, inks and ceramic frits. Tungsten components are also necessary in communications products such as radio, televisions, telephones, mobiles and computer equipments. Most renowned use of tungsten is in fluorescent lamps.

Delco extracts and manufactures tin-tungsten mixed ores from our Dawei mine with an average annual production volume of 300 tonnes. We expect the deployment of our research and development work to stretch production capacity to estimated volume of 1200 tonnes by 2016.